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Be A Grant Writing Expert: Learn About Writing Grant Proposals

Learn all about writing grant proposals with the free information we have for you. Then put it all into practice with our exclusive Write Winning Proposals Toolkit.

The two steps in getting a grant are these:

  1. Search until you find a grant program that matches your situation (covered by the Find Grants Online page).
  2. Apply to the granting agency you found in Step 1 (write a grant proposal, what this page is all about).

We have to say this, even though it likely doesn't apply to you. You CANNOT apply for "debt relief grants" because there's no such thing. If there were, people would just run up debts and then get a government grant to pay them off. It makes no sense.

There is a bright side though. You CAN get grants for other things that you're currently spending money on. The money that you no longer have to spend on those other things can go toward your debt.

That's the way the system works. And it does work well, especially if you know something about writing grant proposals.

About Writing Grant Proposals

When we speak here of "grants," we're just using language everyone uses. It actually means much more than that, because "funding" can be: grants, loans, counseling, coaching and so on.

Writing grant proposals is a form of proposal writing. Even if you're only filling out an application, do it in a convincing way.

The key to success – and what you learn to do so well with the Write Winning Proposals Toolkit – is to show the granting agency that you're helping it to fulfill its mission.

Here are some professional resources to help you do a better job of writing grant proposals (or writing government grants as many like to say).

Finding Grants Online

Many believe the federal site, www.grants.gov, to be THE authority on government grants. But... the reality for individuals is much different. Why?

It's because grants.gov describes federal programs, almost all of which are not available to individuals. The feds give money to the states (and others) who, in turn, do the bulk of grant awards.

It's a great resource though if you simply want to learn something about government grants, with no commercial hype. Be sure to visit it for basic grant information.

One of the things that will surprise you when you visit grants.gov is that there's no handy list that individuals can use to find grants.

Happily, there's a terrific online search alternative. And it's not Google or Bing. It's the Information USA database of grant programs that are available in the United States. It's the best way to find grants online.

Grant Writing For Dummies

Grant Writing For Dummies, 4th Edition, by Dr. Beverly A. Browning is a terrific resource for anyone who wants to increase his or her knowledge of grant-writing. This is what the publisher says:

"As the amount of established granting foundations increases, more money becomes available – but the application process can be long, tedious, and is always highly competitive."
"Grant Writing For Dummies guides you through the entire grant-winning process and helps you stay current with application protocol and new grant opportunities to find a piece of the available $500 billion in government grants."

Click here to learn more about Grant Writing For Dummies and how it so beautifully supplements the Write Winning Proposals training program.

Grant Writing Short Course

We recommend the proposal writing short course offered by the Foundation Center. Here's why:

Although the Foundation course offers a lot, especially for a beginner, it does have some disadvantages:

Despite the disadvantages, we do recommend the course, especially for beginners. Click here to learn more about the Foundation Center grant proposal writing short course.

Please don't hesitate to contact us if you have questions about this page or any others here at WriteWinningProposals.com.

Proposal Writing Guide
Expert Tip For September 25, 2017
Use simple sentence construction in your proposal. There's always a way of getting your points across without using hard to understand, complex sentence construction.
Source: Proposal Writing Guide